Description

Anal adenomas are round to oval growths around the sphincter muscle that consist of glandular tissue.

Urgency

Urgency level 4

Danger

Danger level 3

Course

Anal adenoma is mostly benign but may become aggressive in some cases. Adenomas usually grow slowly and can produce metastates in the anal region. The surface of the growth may break open releasing blood or pus. Due to the release of blood, an anal adenoma can be discovered by observing bloody stools, that upon further inspection, reveal an anal adenoma. Extensive adenomas may block the anal passage thereby impairing defecation.

Cause

Anal adenomas are hormone dependent. This type of growth is more often seen in older, non-altered males.

Therapy

Most anal adenomas regress after neutering. Surgical incision alone is also possible, but reoccurrence is likely.

Emergency measures

If you suspect that your dog is suffering from an anal adenoma, mention it to your veterinarian upon your next visit.